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Chat & Connect with experts and other caregivers like youWe recommend people that know your journey and can help build your very own support network.
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Join care communities that focus on your needsWe call them Huddols and you can join any one of these vibrant communities or create a Huddol of your own.
Stay up to date with the latest caregiving newsMembers in our network are constantly sharing the latest news about care topics that matter to you.

What's Happening on Huddol

We're discussing hundreds of health topics — find what matters to you.

CONDITIONSTOPICS
Tony1inALZCare

Caregivers needed to participate in research study! Are you a caregiver who cares for a relative or friend? If you answered yes, please take the time to complete our survey which will take approximately 30 minutes. You will find our survey by using ...

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surveymonkey.com

Caregiver Resilience and Coping Resources Study Survey

Web survey powered by SurveyMonkey.com. Create your own online survey now with SurveyMonkey's expert certified FREE templates.

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Professional
EvaZatrakProI am a highly qualified Executive Manager, business owner,…38
Recommended Huddol
Grieving the Loss of a Family Member Living with DementiaGriefandDementiaThis huddol is for caregivers who have lost a family member, not to death, but rather to Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or any other related condition.
Professional
SusanHyattProSusan Hyatt is CEO of Silver Sherpa, Inc. For more…12
RichardSteeleProinAlzMontrealCoordinator- Information and reception at the Alzheimer Society of Montreal

Some interesting news from McGill University

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mcgill.ca

Not being aware of memory problems predicts onset of Alzheimer’s disease

Doctors who work with individuals at risk of developing dementia have long suspected that patients who do not realize they experience memory problems are at greater risk of seeing their condition worsen in a short time frame, a suspicion that now has been confirmed by a team of McGill University clinician scientists. Some brain conditions can interfere with a patient’s ability to understand they have a medical problem, a neurological disorder known as anosognosia often associated with Alzheimer’s disease. In a study published today in Neurology, Dr. Pedro Rosa-Neto’s team from McGill’s Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory shows that individuals who experience this lack of awareness present a nearly threefold increase in likelihood of developing dementia within two years. Joseph Therriault, a master’s student in McGill’s Integrated Program in Neuroscience and lead author of the paper drew on data available through the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a global research effort in which participating patients agree to complete a variety of imaging and clinical assessments. Theriault analysed 450 patients who experienced mild memory deficits, but were still capable of taking care of themselves, who had been asked to rate their cognitive abilities. Close relatives of the patient also filled out the similar surveys. When a patient reported having no cognitive problems but the family member reported significant difficulties, he was considered to have poor awareness of illness. Anosognosia is linked to Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology Researchers then compared the poor awareness group to the ones showing no awareness problems and found that those suffering from anosognosia had impaired brain metabolic function and higher rates of amyloid deposition, a protein known to accumulate in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients. A follow up two years later showed that patients who were unaware of their memory problems were more likely to have developed dementia, even when taking into account other factors like genetic risk, age, gender and education. The increased progression to dementia was mirrored by increased brain metabolic dysfunction in regions vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. The finding provides crucial evidence about the importance of consulting with the patient’s close family members during clinical visits. “This has practical applications for clinicians: people with mild memory complaints should have an assessment that takes into account information gathered from reliable informants, such as family members or close friends,” says Dr. Serge Gauthier, co-senior author of the paper and Professor of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Psychiatry and Medicine at McGill. “This study could provide clinicians with insights regarding clinical progression to dementia,” adds Dr. Rosa-Neto, co-senior author of the study and clinician scientist and director of the McGill Center for Studies in Aging, a research center affiliated with the Montreal West Island IUHSSC. The scientists are now taking this research further by exploring how awareness of illness changes across the full spectrum of Alzheimer’s disease, and how these changes are related to critical Alzheimer’s biomarkers. Image caption: Therriault J, et al. (2018) Anosognosia predicts default mode network hypometabolism and clinical progression to dementia, Neurology, Feb 2018 This study was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Alan Tiffin Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association, the Fonds de Recherche du Québec-Santé, and the Centre for Studies on Prevention of AD. « Anosognosia predicts default mode network hypometabolism and clinical progression to dementia », by J. Therriault et al., was published in Neurology.

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MarkStolowProCEO at Huddol - committed to helping every caregiver along the journey.
One Day At A time

If there is any motto or adage that I see more than any other from caregivers it’s “One Day At A Time.”

Why is that? What is it in their experience that leads to the conclusion that what they have the most of is this present moment?

You see a ...

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Recommended Huddol
Alzheimer MontréalAlzMontrealA place to share information, strategies, experiences and concerns with others who are caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.
MarkStolowProCEO at Huddol - committed to helping every caregiver along the journey.

Huddol member looking for insight in a specific domain...anyone have experience with hydrocephalus? A condition in which there is an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain.

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huddol.com

First time posting. Anyone dealing with hydrocephalus leading up to and post surgery. | Huddol

First time posting. Anyone dealing with hydrocephalus leading up to and post surgery.

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mallorysteven08
mallorysteven08 is feeling sad
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mallorysteven08 care for someone with Alzheimer's Disease
terilouinAlzMontrealI care for someone with Alzheimer's Disease

Hi.

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EleanorSilverbergProinGriefandDementiaI help empower caregivers by providing coping tools to strengthen their inner resiliency and…

I will be presenting a FREE webinar on March 8th on tackling Caregiver Guilt. Anything you would like to see covered in this webinar? https://thecare…regiver-guilt/

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"Huddol keeps me connected to resources that help me understand the disease, as well as having access to health care experts who can answer my caregiver related questions. I feel less alone being with others like me."
@Mitzi, cares for her dad with ALS

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Telus, SVX, Cossette Santé, abbvie, Alzheimer Groupe INC, L'appui, Parkinson, Alzheimer Society Montreal, LRA-TCN, Lymphoma Canada, RQMO, Caregiving matters, The Caregiver's Lighthouse, Family Caregivers of British Columbia, Fédération québécoise des Sociétés Alzheimer, Government of CanadaTelus, SVX, Cossette Santé, abbvie, Alzheimer Groupe INC, L'appui, Parkinson, Alzheimer Society Montreal, LRA-TCN, Lymphoma Canada, RQMO, Caregiving matters, The Caregiver's Lighthouse, Family Caregivers of British Columbia, Fédération québécoise des Sociétés Alzheimer, Government of Canada